Category Archives: Business

Affordable Care Act and Your Small Business

You want the best for your employees (and their families), and you know that making sure their health needs are met has been proven to decrease turnover, increase morale and keep your employees well enough to do their jobs worry-free.  With the changes in healthcare, you may question what this will mean to them and your business.  Even though the answers may be different for each business; here are a few facts to help you make important decisions regarding your employees’ wellness, regardless of your business.

–          Notifications – Employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act must make sure all newly hired employees (as of October 1, 2013) are provided with notification about the new Health Insurance Marketplace.  Employers must let employees know they may be eligible for a premium tax credit if they purchase coverage through the Marketplace, and that they may lose the employer contribution (if applicable) to any health benefits plan offered by the employer.

–          SHOP: Access to Health Care Marketplace – Employers with up to 50 full-time or full-time equivalent (FTE) employees will have access to the new health care insurance marketplaces through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP).  Employers with 25 or fewer full-time or FTE employees may also participate in SHOP and may qualify for a small business health care tax credit which is worth up to 50% of your premium costs.

–          Medical Loss Ratio & Rebates – Employers could receive a premium rebate if their insurers do not meet their Medical Loss Ratio.  Employers who receive these rebates and determine that the rebate constitutes a plan asset may determine a reasonable and fair allocation of the rebate.

–          Employer Shared Responsibility – Though employers are not required to provide coverage to their employees under the Affordable Care Act, employers with at least 50 full-time or FTE employees that do not offer health coverage will be subject to a shared responsibility payment under the health care law.  View the chart below.  Businesses with fewer than 50 full-time or FTE employees are generally not affected by these provisions.   Click here for more information.

–          New Wellness Incentives – The Affordable Care Act creates new incentives to promote employer wellness programs and encourages opportunities to support healthier workplaces.  A wellness program can be provided to promote health and fitness at the workplace or insurance plans can offer them directly to their enrollees.

The WBDC is holding a workshop to address the questions of small business owners on March 12, 2014.  To learn more and to register today, please click here.  For more information about the Affordable Care Act, please visit www.healthcare.gov.

employer-penalty-flowchart-v3-071513

Kristin Travis Headshot

By: Kristin Travis, Illinois PTAC Associate

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Government Shutdown and Your Small Business- 5 Things You Need to Know

  1. There are several functions of the U.S. Small Business Administration that will be affected by the recent government shutdown. Click here for SBA’s Plan for Operating in the Event of Lapse of Appropriations packet.  Business functions such as applications for business loans guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) will be halted until the agency returns to its normal operations. The agency will, however, still administer disaster loans for businesses, such as those affected by droughts or Hurricane Sandy.  Existing loan guarantees will remain in effect.  For a complete listing of loans you can and can’t get, please click here.
  2. Contractors can find a listing of the contingency plans of the Federal agencies with which they do business on the White House’s websiteThis includes agencies such as the General Services Administration (GSA), Department of Defense (DoD) and the SBA. You can find a list of full and partial agency shutdowns here.
  3.  Many Federal call centers and help desks will be closed at this time, but some will remain open. The Federal Service Desk – a call center designed to respond to questions regarding your System for Award Management (SAM) registration will remain open.  Additionally, SAM will remain operational; registrations can be updated, managed and processed throughout this time.
  4. Several Federal government websites will not be updated until funds are appropriated to their respective agencies.  Others, however, will currently remain operational, for example, Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps), the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), Security and Exchange Commission (SEC).
  5. Procurement Technical Assistance Centers (PTAC) and Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) like the PTAC/SBDC at the Women’s Business Development Center are here to provide information as it becomes available regarding how your business may be affected.  Please do not hesitate to contact your local PTAC or SBDC.  If your business is located in Illinois, please click here to schedule an appointment with our PTAC/SBDC at the Women’s Business Development Center.  If your business is located outside of Illinois please click here to find a PTAC in your area or here to locate an SBDC in your area.
Kristin Travis Pic

Kristin Travis

 

by: Kristin Travis, IL PTAC Associate

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Filed under Business, Procurement, SBA, Small Business, Uncategorized, WBDC News

Writing Winning Proposals – The Bid/No Bid Decision

By: Freida Curry, Director of the Illinois Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) at the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) In last month’s Insider, I provided 6 steps for writing winning proposals.  The first step listed was ‘Make a Bid/No Bid’ decision.  In this issue, we are going to spend more time on this important step, and have invited Eileen Kent, President of Custom Keynotes, as our guest blogger.  Eileen, who has trained thousands of business owners nationwide in federal sales, proposal writing and GSA schedule contracting, is known in the industry as the “Federal Sales Sherpa” because she guides companies up the long and treacherous mountain path of federal contracting. 

The following are Eileen’s comments and suggestions about establishing a bid/no bid decision process: 

Eileen Kent

In my experience, one of the more rocky roads up the path to federal sales success is writing a blind proposal as a response to a bid posted on the public website FedBizOpps.gov. It’s as dangerous as walking up a mountain path with a blindfold on. You only have only a 5% chance of making it to the top three finalists.

If that is the case, then why do owners gamble their resources when there is such a low probability of making it to the top? Because owners believe their companies are perfect for the project – when, in fact, they often had no business bidding on it in the first place!

It is crucial that you take the time to evaluate and explore whether you should bid or not bid on an ‘opportunity,’ and I strongly advise owners and business development professionals to build a bid/no bid decision process that helps you decide which proposals to invest your time and talent.

Build a Bid/No Bid Decision Process

In my opinion and experience, you don’t stand a chance if you’ve never pre-sold to the customer inside the government. The goal is to “only write winners” (proposals) and that means you’ve already pre-sold the solution and you’re simply defending the win within theproposal.

A great way to judge your potential success is to ask yourself these questions below. If you don’t know any of the answers, you’re writing a blind bid and that means you only have a 5% chance or less of winning.

  1. Who is the incumbent?
  2. What does the customer think of the incumbent?
  3. Who are the other competitors calling on the client?
  4. Can the incumbent bid on this opportunity? What if they are a large business and the proposal states it is seeking small businesses? Could they bid with a small business teaming partner? If so, who is that small business? What does the customer think of them?
  5. Do I have the bonding capacity and the finances to be able to back such a project?
  6. Do I have the ability to provide the government agency the transparency it requires in terms of my costs, my team’s pay and my finance system? Would I withstand a Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) audit?
  7. Have I performed work at this agency before? How did I perform?
  8. What are the past performance requirements? Did I do something in similar size and scope – at that agency?
  9. What are the products the government agency is requesting? Do I have the name brand products it is requesting or the “equivalent?”
  10. Does the customer know me? Do I know the customer? Have we worked together? Did they ask me to watch out for this bid?
  11. Have I built teaming partners and lined them up prior to the bid hitting the streets?
  12. What is the contract vehicle? Do I have it? If it is an Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, do I have the sales team to uncover and win each task?
  13. What are the billing processes and the invoicing procedures at this agency?
  14. If the government agency is asking for key staff, do I have THE people on my staff it  told me it wanted or am I just filling a position to fit their description?
  15. Is this opportunity in my specialty? Do they know me for this specialty?
  16. Do I have the security clearances for this project, or am I scrambling to get them now?
  17. Do I know the story behind the opportunity? Why is this on FedBizOpps? Why didn’t they use a current prime, a GSA schedule or another contracting vehicle to avoid all the “noise” of a public procurement?
  18. When did I hear about this bid?
  19. When is the bid due?
  20. Was I invited to bid, or did I just pull this off the public bidding website?
  21. Who do I know at the agency – the end user, the contracting officer, or the stakeholder, or all three or none?

My motto is “Write Less Proposals – WIN More.” If you put as much time and investment in knowing the answers to the above questions by developing strong relationships, great past performance and excellent teaming partnerships before the bid hits the streets – as you do writing the proposal – you should be in a good position to be among the top three finalists. And even if you lose, you’re in a great position to be the winner the next time around.

If you want to hear more from Eileen Kent, visit her website at http://www.customkeynotes.com.

For more information on proposal writing, certification, finding contract opportunities, and developing a government contracting strategy we invite you to schedule a free appointment today with a WBDC Illinois PTAC counselor by calling 312-853-3477 x 100.

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Breakfast Panelists #EWC27 Part 2 – Emilia DiMenco & Debra Jennings-Johnson, Plus Moderator Terry Savage

If you’re in the market for some great business words of wisdom and inspiration, then you won’t want to miss the 27th Annual Entrepreneurial Woman’s Conference on Thursday, September 26, at McCormick Place.

Emilia DiMenco

Emilia DiMenco

Joining WBDC co-founders Hedy Ratner and Carol Dougal on stage at the popular Forum Breakfast will be three women with a passion for helping women business owners succeed. They’re oh-so-ready, willing and eager to share their tips on what it takes to make it in the business world.

Emilia DiMenco, the WBDC’s dynamic new president and CEO, and Debra Jennings-Johnson, supplier diversity director at BP America Inc. and the WBDC’s long-time board president, will participate in what is certain to be a dynamic conversation, moderated by best-selling author Terry Savage.

When you bump into Emilia, Debra or Terry at the Conference, make sure you have these personal tidbits to launch a conversation that can build your business connections!

Debra Jennings-Johnson

Debra Jennings-Johnson

  • Emilia loves to travel abroad. As a graduation present, Emilia will take her soon-to-be-an-engineer son on a trip to Africa. Last year, she took a three-week trip to China.
  • Debra, who collects antiques and art, was inspired to have a career in business because of two role models: her successful aunts.
  • When she’s not traveling to major speaking engagements or writing another book on finance, Terry relaxes at her second home in Wisconsin where she boats and rides one of two show horses.
Terry Savage

Terry Savage

So what the does future hold for this evolving organization and women’s business ownership in general?  To find out, don’t miss EWC and as always, stay tuned to the WBDC’s Twitter and Facebook accounts! One thing’s for sure:  the WBDC will continue its commitment to fighting the challenges that continue to exist everywhere for women- and minority-owned businesses.

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Filed under #EWC27, Business, Business Leaders, Uncategorized, WBDC

Writing a Winning Proposal

Freida Curryby: Freida Curry, Director of the Illinois Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) at the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC)

Successful proposal writing is one of the important keys to winning contracts, whether it is in the private or public sector.  When responding to a Request for Proposal (RFP) there are several important factors to keep in mind.

  1. Make a bid/no bid decision.  Before spending time, money, effort and resources to prepare a proposal, you want to determine if this is the right opportunity for you.  Review the scope of work thoroughly.   Are you capable of satisfactorily fulfilling all that would be required of you according to what is asked in the RFP?  Do you have the financial ability to deliver quality products/service on time?  Do you have time to prepare a dynamic proposal?
  2. Attend pre- proposal meetings (if applicable).  If a meeting is offered you definitely want to attend!  At these meetings you have an opportunity to meet the buyers and ask questions.  In addition, prime contractors, contracting officers, buyers, supplier diversity specialists and other small business owners are likely to be present.  This provides a unique opportunity for networking for the purposes of subcontracting, teaming and relationship-building.
  3. Research. You want to do research to insure that you have identified all of the information that can assist you in writing a strong proposal.  This can be about your competitors, the incumbent contract holder, the contracting agency’s or corporation’s buying trends, or industry trends, etc.   For government proposals, you can check agency procurement sites, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), or public research sites like Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS).
  4. Break down the work.  Create an outline to make your efforts in responding to the RFP more manageable. If you are working with a team, assign duties to specify who will address each section of the proposal.  Also, make sure the headlines you use in your proposal match the headlines for each section within the RFP.  Set a timeline that allows several days to proofread and make necessary changes. Give yourself ample time to submit your proposal – being even a minute late can result in your proposal being deemed ‘non responsive’.
  5. Write your proposal so that it about the buyer – and not about you.  This is one of the most important steps for writing a winning proposal!  Your proposal must make it clear to the buyer that you understand their problems and that you can provide the solutions to solve them.
  6. Get a debrief. The last and often overlooked step is to request a debriefing – most government agencies are required by law to give one and many corporations offer them as well.  A debriefing is an opportunity to find out more information on how your proposal was evaluated and why you were not awarded (or awarded) the contract.   Debriefings will be valuable for understanding how buyers perceive your strengths or weaknesses; this knowledge will be invaluable for future proposals

All in all, responding to a Request for Proposal can be manageable process, if you seek guidance (when needed), do your research and allow yourself ample time to complete each step of the process. Remember — write your proposal with the client in mind making it clear and readable.  And remember — always answer the question the buyer is asking —  ‘What’s In It For Me?’

Schedule an appointment with the WBDC for more tips and pointers.  Also, a site with a wealth of information is www.CapturePlanning.com.

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WBDC 4th Annual Technology Makeover Contest Winner – Rebecca Fyffe, ABC Humane Wildlife

We are all familiar with pigeons, especially those of located in the metro Chicago area.  And we all tend to have the same feelings about them – “gross, get rid of them.”  One Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE) is making that happen: ABC Humane Wildlife. The company is led by Rebecca Fyffe who serves as the president and submitted the winning Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) Technology Makeover Competition.

2013 marked the first year the WBDC Technology Makeover Competition was offered on a national scale and only to Women Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) Certified WBEs.  The WBDC received applications from California to Florida and found there continues to be a need for updated technology within businesses of all sizes.

Rebecca’s organization has big plans for the software and hardware they won:

“The WBDC’s Technology Makeover is the best thing that could ever happen to my company. It would allow me to make a powerful and instant change that I estimate would increase my leads by 40 percent or more immediately! Within 90 days of having new hardware (server and workstations) ready to run our custom software, we would have the program in place just in time for the peak breeding season for most of Illinois’ animals as well as peak nest building season for bees.”

tech makeover

From L-R: Mark Key, CDW; Rebecca Fyffe, ABC Humane Wildlife; Carol Dougal, WBDC

ABC Humane Wildlife was announced as the winner of the Competition at WBENC’s 2013 National Conference & Business Fair in Minneapolis in June.  As a part of the prize package, Rebecca received hardware, software and marketing services from AT&T, CDW, Market M and Microsoft, as well as tickets to the WBDC’s 2013 Entrepreneurial Woman’s Conference and WBENC’s 2014 National Conference.

For more information on ABC Humane Wildlife, please click here.

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Filed under Business, Technology, Uncategorized, WBDC News, WBDC- Minnesota, WBE, Women Business Owner, Women in Business

5 Tips for Building Business Relationships that Lead to Successful Corporate Contracting

Cynthia Johnson, WBDC Director of Established Business Services

Cynthia Johnson, WBDC Director of Established Business Services

Contracting with major corporations can bring big bucks to any business, but what are the best ways to accomplish your goal of building the key relationships that mean profit for your business? Cynthia Johnson, Women’s Business Development Center’s (WBDC) Director of Established Business Services, shares five tips for successful corporate contracting:

1. Do research – doing business with a corporation isn’t about what they can do for you, but rather what you can do for them. The best way to find out their needs is to really understand a corporation’s mission, history, goals etc. Small business owners, particularly women and minorities, should create a vendor profile on the corporation’s supplier diversity page. The vendor profile includes contact information and other pertinent information about your business and can be accessed by supplier diversity representatives and corporate buyers. On the supplier diversity page, not only can you find information regarding corporation objectives, but you can be notified of outreach events and other relationship building opportunities.

Connection Points

2. Network with fellow small business owners – networking is vital, so make it count. We have an entire program called Connection Points built around the concept of focused networking. Networking with those who are in related or complimentary industries can offer all involved parties the opportunity to share ideas, trends, talents for the purposes of building relationships and strengthening businesses.

3. Value Proposition – it is important to write and maintain a strong value proposition, a clear concise “living” document that is used to give potential corporate clients a glimpse at the value your business can offer them. Your value proposition can be used as a means to introduce yourself or to as a relationship building tool in a one-on-one presentation meeting with the potential corporate client such as WBDC’s Contract Connections Program. In a value proposition you should:

Lead with your business strengths – make sure you highlight your capacity to manage awarded contracts, your financial strength & stability, past successes, bonding capacity (if applicable) and that you exemplify outstanding client services & best practices. Simply stating “I’m certified” won’t do; you must also display that you will offer the same high performance that corporations expect of all businesses they work with, and as a value-add you are also a certified WBE, MBE, DBE or VBE*.

4. Keep current – Renew your certifications and don’t let them lapse. Make sure you have paid close attention to any deadlines and paperwork you may have to complete to make this possible. Keeping current also means continuing to grow within your industry. Joining trade associations, subscribing to industry publications, attending industry events and sharing information with your professional peers will help you to stay relevant and build your expertise. These items are also impressive to add to your supplier diversity vendor profile and value proposition.

5. Be Persistent, But Patient – building a relationship in the business world is like building any other relationship. You want to let your potential corporate clients know you exist and highlight your value to them, but remember building a relationship takes time. Follow up is encouraged, but don’t be overbearing, when making a call or sending an email give time for the supplier diversity representative to process the information. Strong business relationships can take months or even years to cultivate, but in time, using these steps you can set the groundwork to be a success in corporate contracting.

For more information or set up an appointment to develop your corporate contracting plan, please call 312.853.3477 or contact Cynthia Johnson at cjohnson@wbdc.org. For government contracting tips, click here.
*WBE: Women’s Business Enterprise. MBE: Minority Business Enterprise. VBE: Veteran Business Enterprise. DBE: Disadvantaged Business Enterprise

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Filed under Business, Established Business, Supplier Diversity, WBE, Women Business Owner, Women in Business

Gear Up for Growth – WBDC’s Child Care Business Expo Boosts Business in Chicago

Did you join the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) for our 15th Anniversary Child Care Business Expo on June 1st?  If you missed it, here’s a rundown of the inspirational and educational day:

Over 500 attendees…

Child Care Business Expo

visited 55 Exhibitors ranging from Illinois Action for Children to Dominick’s…

Exhibitors CCBE 2013

 and heard from 5 Deserving Award Winners.

Watch the video playlist below to meet:

– Arabel Alva Rosales, AAR & Associates, LTD., Child Care Champion Award Winner

– Lindsay Cochrane, representing Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Friend of Child Care Award Winner

– Peg Dunne Pavelec, Little Inspirations, Fast Track Award Winner

– Teresa Gomez, Wonderland Day Care Center & Wonderland Home Day Care, Unsung Hero Award Winner

Dr. Latrice Walker, Pre-Fit, Hedy M. Ratner & S. Carol Dougal Legacy Award Winner

Child Care Business Expo Legacy Award

2 Shift Into High Gear Afternoon Workshops taught entrepreneurs effective marketing and business finance.

CCBE Afternoon Workshop

2 Stellar Expo Chairs – Patty Kryscha, Southwest Airlines & Kimberlee Burt, A Child’s Space welcomed guests.

Expo Co Chairs

2 Dynamic Honorary Co-Chairs

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle & Illinois Lt. Governor Sheila Simon (not pictured)

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle opening the Exhibit Hall with WBDC co-president Hedy Ratner (w/ scissors)

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle opening the Exhibit Hall with WBDC co-president Hedy Ratner (w/ scissors) and Expo Co-Chair Kimberlee Burt (far right).

One powerful Luncheon panel shared their insights into the future of Illinois child care.

Luncheon Panel

(L-R): Kate Cozzani, Monique Draper, Janice Lopez and Arabel Alva Rosales

Did you experience the Expo with us?  Do you have any questions that didn’t get answered at one of the workshops? Ask them below!

To see more pictures from the event, check out the WBDC Facebook page.

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Filed under Business, Business Start-up, Child Care, Marketing, Small Business, Special Events, Uncategorized, WBDC

Contracting Tips from WBDC’s IL PTAC Director

Freida Curry

Freida Curry, IL PTAC Director

Contracting with local and federal government agencies can be a challenging process without the proper guidance.  The Illinois Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) at the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) is here to assist in this process.  Freida Curry, IL PTAC Director sat down to give five tips to building an effective government contracting strategy:

  1. Laser focus on one or two government agencies in which to do business.  Do your research to find government agencies that buy what your business sells
  2. Create a capability statement for your business.  This “living” document lists your core competencies, past performance distinctions and other pertinent information about your business.  Click here to read more about capability statements.
  3. If you want to do business with the Federal government, you will need to register your business in the System for Award Management (SAM). Please click here to access the SAM website. If you want to do business with a local government agency, register yourself as a vendor on their procurement page.
  4. Report your economic impact! Reporting of your economic impact is directly tied to the funding PTACs receive to keep counseling free and keep workshops and seminars at a low (or no) cost. (Illinois businesses may report economic impact by clicking here.)
  5. Schedule a counseling session at no charge with your local PTAC. If your business is located in Illinois, please click here to register for PTAC counseling, if your business is not located in Illinois; please click here to locate the PTAC nearest you. PTACs can provide your business with:
    • Customized research to be applied to your government contracting strategy
    • A free service such as Bid Match to send contract opportunities tailored to business straight to your email
    • A review of your bid package, capability statement, SAM profile and many other government contract related documents

For more information or to schedule a PTAC appointment today please contact Kristin Travis at ktravis@wbdc.org or 312.853.3477.

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The Tax (Wo)Man Cometh! WBDC Gets Advice from the IRS

Yolanda Ruiz

Yolanda Ruiz

With Tax Season quickly approaching, we at the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) want to make sure you are the most prepared you can be when it comes to doing your small business taxes.  Who better to ask about taxes then the IRS?  For that we turn to Yolanda Ruiz, IRS expert and employee and frequent presenter at WBDC workshops on business taxes.

1.       What is the number one question you get from small business owners seeking assistance with their taxes?

“Unfortunately, many come to me when they are behind in their taxes asking about payment options. One of our partners noted ‘One of the major obstacles that business owners encounter with their businesses was not being aware of their responsibilities to the IRS. Most are repaying the IRS for lack of paying payroll taxes or estimated tax payments.’ It’s hard to catch up when you fall behind, knowledge is key.”

2.       What is a common misconception you see about taxes or the process of filing?

“Trying to reduce your tax bill is illegal. Actually, with tax planning you can legitimately reduce your taxes. Washington is constantly sending out incentives in way of additional write-offs and hiring credits (Section 179, Bonus Depreciation, HIRE). Utilizing these incentives will reduce your tax bill while expanding your business.”

3.        What resources are available to small business owners (especially those on a budget)?

“E-news for Small Businesses is an electronic newsletter that comes out every other Wednesday. It will provide you with information on current incentives (additional deductions/credits) for small business as well as free resources. To subscribe go to: http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Subscribe-to-e-News-for-Small-Businesses

IRS also has VITA sites that offer free tax help to people who make $51,000 or less and need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. For a VITA site near you, go to – http://irs.treasury.gov/freetaxprep/

The IRS is proud to partner with Center for Economic Progress/ Tax Clinic. They can help you if you have a dispute or problem with the IRS to solve your issues quickly.  Also, they will be able to file current and previous tax returns. Call the Tax Clinic at (312) 630-0241 for an appointment, or go to http://www.economicprogress.org/clients/got-letter-irs for more information.

The IRS is proud to partner with The Law Project, a nonprofit that provides free services to qualified business start-ups: http://www.thelawproject.org

4.       What online resources would you recommend?

“The Virtual Small Business Tax Workshop online is composed of nine interactive lessons designed to help new small business owners learn their tax rights and responsibilities. It includes topics such as EIN, Business Structures, Recordkeeping, Classifying Worker and Business Taxes.

Small Business and Self-Employed Tax Center on irs.gov – http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Small-Business-and-Self-Employed-Tax-Center-1

No more spending time navigating the IRS website, all that you need is on this page. “

“The purpose for tax education is not to make you a tax professional but to give you an awareness of your tax responsibilities and the many benefits that are available. By having an awareness of how your business should be run (for tax purposes) you can ensure that your accountant/tax preparer is compliant with filing and payments, you will avoid problems and you will allow your business to grow.”

The WBDC also wants to make sure you and your employees know about the Earned Income Tax Credit, or EITC. If you file as a Schedule C, you as a self-employed individual may be able to receive the credit.  Click here to learn more.

The EITC is a refundable federal income tax credit for low to moderate income working individuals and families. With the additional funds, the majority of recipients invest back into their local economy and can truly help grow small businesses.  To learn more about the EITC, please click here.

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Filed under Business, Business Start-up, IRS, Taxes, WBDC, Women Business Owner, Women in Business